Education and Outreach

Our dedication to Community Outreach

Learn about our Education and Outreach Services to see how we can help you.

Education and Outreach

Our dedication to Community Outreach

Learn about our Education and Outreach Services to see how we can help you.

AVDA Programs

AVDA believes early prevention and intervention are the keys to ending domestic abuse. We provide educational programs for youth and adults as well as have staff and volunteers dedicated to community outreach. All programs are free and may be scheduled by contacting AVDA Youth and Outreach Director, Nicole Franklin-Jones at NicoleF@avda-tx.org or 713.715.6921.

Community Outreach

Community Outreach

Our goals for outreach are provide prevention, intervention and to foster a community-wide response to abuse and, at the same time, provide information to individuals in need of AVDA’s services. AVDA staffs health fairs, community and faith-based meetings year-round to meet the demand for information on domestic abuse. Sensitive to Houston’s diverse population, AVDA provides materials in Arabic, Urdu, Hindi, Vietnamese, and Spanish, and has a Spanish-speaking Youth and Outreach Specialist on staff. AVDA also has a Mandarin Chinese speaker available for speaking engagements if requested.

Educational Programming

Educational Programming

For adults, we offer specialized training for groups ranging from criminal justice workers, healthcare providers, Child Protective Services agents, and pro bono attorneys to corporations and veteran groups. Our presentation topics can range from AVDA domestic violence services to workplace violence and more. AVDA remains a respected source of customized community education and awareness with skilled trainers for a variety of audiences in English, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese.

For youth, we have developed curricula for specific abuse prevention and intervention programs that focus on healthy relationships. We provide these programs to schools as well as organizations serving at-risk youth. We also offer individual and group counseling upon request.

Safe Dates

Safe Dates

The nationally acclaimed Safe Dates program for middle and high school students (both male and female) is designed to stop or prevent the initiation of dating violence victimization and perpetration, including the psychological, physical, and sexual abuse that may occur between youths involved in a dating relationship.

Safe dates is an eight-session program (generally one meeting per week over a two-month period) that teaches attitudes and behaviors associated with dating abuse and violence. The program typically takes place in schools and in detention facilities for at-risk youth.

Teen Abuse Prevention Program

Teen Abuse Prevention Program

AVDA’s Teen Abuse Prevention program is a presentation for middle and high school male and female students that addresses teenage dating abuse. This program educates students on the types of abuse, the warning signs and the consequences of abuse. Unhealthy relationships are illustrated by utilizing  the Power and Control Wheel while the Equality Wheel helps explain the nature of healthy relationships.

Coaching Boys into Men

Coaching Boys into Men

Coaching Boys into Men (SM) is a violence prevention program for sports coaches designed to inspire them to teach their young male athletes about the importance of respect for themselves and others, particularly women and girls.

Click here to find out more or email nicolef@avda-tx.org to sign up.

Houston-area coaches of middle and high school, college, and select male  teams are encouraged to participate in this free program that trains coaches to use their influence to help athletes to build character, promote healthy relationships, and prevent sexual and dating violence. Participants begin with a four-hour training workshop that counts toward district professional development and receive all training materials necessary to implement the CBIM program. Over the course of the school year, CBIM coaches lead their players through brief, weekly activities that address themes such as personal responsibility, respectful behaviors, and relationship abuse. Topics covered each week include insulting language, disrespectful behavior, digital abuse, and what it means to “be a man.”

As a result of this training, sports  coaches will:

  • Better understand their role as a coach in influencing how young men treat women and girls;
  • Recognize “teachable moments” when they occur; and
  • Possess the tools to educate young men regarding dating violence.

Teams are encouraged to involve their fans, parents, faculty, other students and school administrators in support of CBIM’s message. By and large, athletes are often popular and influential leaders among their peers. The qualities of a successful athlete such as discipline, cooperation, and integrity are also the building blocks to becoming a respectful individual and a role model for others.

CBIM is a program of Futures Without Violence, a nonprofit organization that works to end violence against women, children and families around the world.

Adolescent and Young Adult Dating Abuse Facts

Violent behavior typically begins between the ages of 12 and 18. However, when it comes to adolescent and young adult domestic abuse, AVDA’s Youth and Outreach Program staff emphasizes the impact of all forms of abuse on a relationship, whether physical, verbal, emotional, sexual, psychological, financial or spiritual.

The statistics on youth dating abuse in the U.S. are overwhelming:

  • One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.
  • One in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend. Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.
  • Girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence — almost triple the national average.
  • College students are not equipped to deal with dating abuse – 57% say it is difficult to identify, and 58% say they don’t know how to help someone who’s experiencing it.
  • One in three (36%) dating college students has given a dating partner their computer, online access, email or social network passwords, and these students are more likely to experience digital dating abuse.
  • Nearly half (43%) of dating college women report experiencing violent and abusive dating behaviors while one in six (16%) college women has been sexually abused in a dating relationship.

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AVDA
1001 Texas Ave., Suite 600 Houston, TX 77002
P: 713-224-9911
F: 713-715-6935 | 713-715-6945

AVDA

1001 Texas Ave., Suite 600 Houston, TX 77002 P: 713-224-9911 F: 713-715-6935 | 713-715-6945

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